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Inc. Magazine Unveils 35th Annual List of

America’s Fastest-Growing Private Companies—the Inc. 500

Digital Enterprise Corporation Ranks No. 407 on the 2016 Inc. 500

with Three-Year Sales Growth of 947%

 

NEW YORK, August 17, 2016 – Inc. magazine today ranked Digital Enterprise Corporation NO. 407 on its 35th annual Inc. 500, the most prestigious ranking of the nation's fastest-growing private companies. The list represents a unique look at the most successful companies within the US economy’s most dynamic segment— its independent small businesses. Companies such as Microsoft, Dell, Domino’s Pizza, Pandora, Timberland, LinkedIn, Yelp, Zillow, and many other well-known names gained their first national exposure as honorees of the Inc. 500.


Transformation & DevOps has become the watchword of our digital economy. Most businesses are certainly struggling with change and are engaged in significant transformation and conversion to the new DevOps mode of operations. Often lost in the urge to change, however, is an examination of the very nature of new change. At Digital Enterprise, we are proud to work shoulder-to-shoulder with our clients, sharing our knowledge and expertise to deliver exceptional Enterprise Digital Transformation, DevOps, Innovation Lab and Data Science Solutions and services that create results with lasting impact.


The 2016 Inc. 500, unveiled on Inc.com and with the top 500 companies featured in the September issue of Inc. is the most competitive crop in the list’s history. The average company on the list achieved a mind-boggling three-year growth of 433%. The Inc. 500’s aggregate revenue is $200 billion and the companies on the list collectively generated 640,000 jobs over the past three years, or about 8% of all jobs created in the entire economy during the same period. Complete results of the Inc. 500, including company profiles and an interactive database that can be sorted by industry, region, and other criteria, can be found at www.inc.com/inc5000.


"The Inc. 5000 list stands out where it really counts,” says Inc. President and Editor-In-Chief Eric Schurenberg. “It honors real achievement. No company makes the Inc. 500 without building something great – usually from scratch. That’s one of the hardest things to do in business. But without it, free enterprise fails.”

For more information, contact:

Digital Enterprise Corporation

10 Glenlake Parkway, Suite 130

Atlanta, GA  30328

Phone: 1.888.666.7705
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Web: https://digitalenterprise.io


About Digital Enterprise:

Digital Enterprise is a global software and services company based in Atlanta, Georgia. Our core services are Enterprise Digital Transformation, DevOps & Extreme Labs, and Data Science related solutions and services.

 

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Executive Leadership Institute Announces a New Board Member


Atlanta, Georgia — Executive Leadership Institute announces the appointment of Mr. Jim Hasty as a new member of its Board of Directors for 2016.


Mr. Hasty is the General Manager in the South Eastern U.S. for Magenic, a full-service modern application development firm focused
on solving complex, mission-critical software development challenges with quality and speed. He is a  highly accomplished Information Technology sales and business leader with a track record of building and leading organizations for successfully driving sales and implementing technical solutions for clients across multiple industries. Mr. Hasty holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Finance from The University of Alabama and an MBA from Georgia State University.


The Executive Leadership Institute is a premier executive membership organization and business forum. The goal of the Institute is to connect members, providing opportunities for strategic relationship development, access to intellectual exchange & world class speakers, and enhanced exposure to the broader business community.


Through Executive Leadership Institute signature series programs, committees, and networking events, we bring together business, civic and academic leaders from all industries to discuss issues and opportunities affecting business in our chapters in United States and the world.



Executive Leadership Institute

Board of Directors



2886 Sandy Plains Rd 

Suite 670715

Marietta, Georgia 30066

USA


Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone: 1.888.999.0519
http://www.executiveleadership.institute

Background

In early 2014 Apple released a new language for creating iOS applications called Swift. In September 2014 Swift reached 1.0 status. Since then there have been many questions regarding Swift’s position relative to Objective-C, as well as the future of Objective-C.


Outlook

Our belief is that, at least in the near term, Swift will continue to co-exist with Objective-C. We expect both languages will also continue to get first class support for existing and new features as they are added to the iOS platform.


What is Swift?

Swift is a language that is based on C and Objective-C but is designed to make development and learning to develop iOS applications easier while introducing advanced language constructs such as generics and closures. Like Objective-C, Swift can access the full range of the Cocoa and Cocoa Touch APIs. In short, one may conclude that Swift is a better language for creating true native applications than Objective-C; however, this is not always the case. Like most other development languages, Swift is a language in progress and will continue to evolve over time. As it is much newer than Objective-C, Swift is likely to evolve at a faster pace.


Swift Pros and Cons

Does Swift have any limitations compared to Objective-C? In a word, yes. In particular, Swift only supports iOS7 and above. While this may not be a problem for many applications there is a small but persistent community of users who are still running iOS devices with versions lower than 7 installed. This number was hovering around 4% of all devices as of January 2015.

Generally, we have found that some enterprises have resisted moving to newer versions of iOS due to maintenance and compatibility concerns with their current portfolio of iOS applications.



Are there any other potential issues I should consider with Swift?

Being a new language, Swift does not have the same level of governance and guidance direction as the more established Objective-C. This may be acceptable for a single developer; however, for systems being created by multiple people a stronger level of internal team governance and review may be required to make sure the code structure is internally consistent within a given project or set of projects. In this way Swift is more like C#, JavaScript, or Java where there is less formal guidance on how code should be structured and problems solved.


If Swift is Apple’s new iOS development language, does that mean that Objective-C will be going away?

No, at least not in the near future. Apple still uses Objective-C in its internal projects. Given the comparatively short lifecycle of mobile applications, applications built today will be retired long before Objective-C reaches end of life.

It is not unusual for companies like Apple to maintain more than one application development language. For example, Microsoft currently maintains Visual C++, C#, VB.Net, F#, and other development technologies. The mere existence of a second language within a company like Apple does not necessarily indicate the removal of the first. What would be indicative, however, is if Apple stops updating Objective-C. If that occurs, our recommendation may change.


What are the advantages of using Swift?

Swift has advantages over Objective-C in both simplicity and language capabilities. For new developers Swift is easier to learn. For many of the same reasons—such as learning simplicity—enterprises write applications in C# instead of Visual C++ on the Microsoft stack, they may also choose to work with Swift over Objective-C on the iOS stack. That simplicity to learn does not mean Swift has fewer features; however, many advanced language constructs exist in Swift that do not exist in Objective-C. So not only is it easier to learn, once it is learned it gives access to some useful capabilities such as generics.


If I think I might transition from Objective-C to Swift or vice versa, is there anything I can do today to make this transition easier?

Starting with XCode 6.0 Apple added dynamic frameworks which allow you to create a collection of code and resources that can be used in multiple projects. With this capability, cross-project shared components could be written in one language and replaced with another at a later date. This is allowed because mixed language projects are also allowed, so it is conceivable to replace a class or collection of classes written in Objective-C with one written in Swift later. Having said that, care must be taken with this type of extensibility in mind. How you might ideally solve a problem in Objective-C may not be how you would best solve it in Swift. Replacing pieces of code piecemeal only works if the interface to that code is generally kept the same. For example, replacing a class in Swift that uses generics to one in Objective-C that does not may not be possible without substantial refactoring of the code that calls it. Does Swift vs. Objective-C change when I would consider using a hybrid technology like Cordova or near-native technology like Xamarin? Generally no. Technologies like Xamarin or Cordova are usually selected to solve crossplatform challenges or when there is already internal competency in .Net or JavaScript. The addition of Swift does not substantially alter that equation. However, it does lower the barrier to entry for new developers to learn cross-platform, true native languages. It is likely easier for such a person to pick up Swift and Java than it would be to pick up Objective-C and Java. While that probably still isn’t as easy as just learning .Net or the HTML5/CSS/JS stack, it lowers the bar far enough where this may be a viable option for more people than it has been previously.


Are there any performance implications?

When Swift was first released Apple mentioned some areas where Swift clearly outperformed Objective-C. However, it also found that in some areas Objective-C was faster than Swift. Since then Apple has done much to improve the performance of Swift. In some cases Swift 1.2 is now slightly faster than Objective-C. However, the difference is marginal between the two and will likely not be the key selection factor. [https://medium.com/@harrycheung/mobile-app-performance-redux-e512be94f976]



Does either language have any cross platform capabilities outside of the Apple Ecosystem?

Microsoft recently released news that you will be able to adapt and compile Objective-C applications to run on the Windows Phone 10 platform with ARM processors. Additionally, at WWDC 15 Apple announced that Swift as a language would be open source by the year’s end. This opens up speculation that sometime in the future Swift may be useful to create applications on platforms other than Apple’s.


When should I use Objective-C?

• You have a substantial internal competency with Objective-C
• You have a substantial portfolio of apps written in Objective-C and would like to keep your support footprint low
• You need to support applications that target iOS 6 and earlier
• You are interoperating with large amounts of existing Objective-C code
• Your team could benefit from the directive governance and guidance that exists around the Objective-C stack
• You plan on making mobile applications for iOS and Windows Phone, but not Android • You like pointers


When should I use Swift?

• You have substantial internal competency with Swift
• You have a substantial portfolio of apps written in Swift and would like to keep your support footprint low
• You are only working with iOS 7 and later
• You have developers who are new to the Apple development stack that you would like to start working in true native technologies as soon as possible
• You are interoperating with large amounts of existing Swift code
• Your team has strong internal governance and guidance practices
• You have no existing true native iOS applications or capabilities and want to keep costs as low as possible without sacrificing capability (In general, for enterprise applications, languages that are easier to learn and have advanced modern language features have had advantages in development speed and cost of maintenance on other stacks. There is no reason to believe that the Apple stack will deviate.)
• You dislike pointers


Conclusion Apple will likely support Objective-C and Swift for the near future as first class languages on the Apple stack. Companies with substantial investments in applications and capabilities using Objective-C may want to either stay with Objective-C or only move to Swift as part of a deliberate plan. Additionally, organizations that need to support iOS 6 and below should gravitate to Objective-C. Organizations with no existing or limited iOS true native code and capabilities may want to consider Swift. It will be easier to learn and offer more modern language features. Mobile technology decisions are complex and involve a constantly changing landscape, one which Magenic is uniquely qualified to help clients navigate due to our customized agonistic and diagnostic approach.


About the Author:

KevinFord

Kevin Ford is Practice Lead, Mobile Development in Magenic. Responsible for increasing the delivery capabilities in mobile technologies in Magenic's national mobile practice and Magenic's regional offices. With this comes a key role in growing and shaping our mobile practice through training and mentoring consultants, setting mobile technical direction, and bringing visibility to Magenic's mobile capabilities by being a community thought leader.


Magenic's mobile delivery capabilities include vendor native tools with Objective-C/Swift, Java and C#, Xamarin and Cordova. Magenic's mobile practice lead needs to be fluent in all of these and with that set the tone for how these technologies can be successfully leveraged to create mobile applications in the enterprise.

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April 27th, 2016


Executive Leadership Institute Announces a New Board Member


Atlanta, Georgia — Executive Leadership Institute announces the appointment of Mr. Humberto Castillo as a new member of its Board of Directors for 2016.


Mr. Humberto Castillo was the 
President and Board Member UPS Capital® Business Credit. He is a global General Management executive with extensive expertise in operations, and leading geographical disperse teams in a variety of business models. His background in solution selling/implementation, startups, turnarounds, fast growth and integration on a global basis.


The Executive Leadership Institute is a premier executive exclusive membership organization and business forum. The goal of the Institute is to connect members, advance the careers of the next generation leadership & executives, providing opportunities for strategic relationship development, access to intellectual exchange & world class speakers, and enhanced exposure to the broader business community.


Through Executive Leadership Institute signature series programs, committees, and networking events, we bring together business, civic and academic leaders from all industries to discuss issues and opportunities affecting business in our chapters in United States and the world.



Executive Leadership Institute

Board of Directors



2886 Sandy Plains Rd 

Suite 670715

Marietta, Georgia 30066

USA


Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone: 1.888.999.0519
http://www.executiveleadership.institute

7 Things Traditionally Non-IT Companies Need to Get Right for Their DevOps Implementations

By: Kambiz Khadem Ph.D.

In our last article, “Your Competitive Advantages Pivots on Portability, Elasticity, Scalability and Agility,” we explored some of the factors that can impact an organization’s competitive advantages. Now, we turn our attention to one of the main enablers of the above factors: the successful implementation of “DevOps”. Interestingly enough, Devops is neither a product nor a new technology and, to be frank, there is no universal methodology or approach for its implementation.

DevOps, by definition, is a collection of software development methods that emphasizes communication, collaboration, resource sharing, integration, automation, and measurement of cooperation between software developers and other IT professionals. In reality, DevOps is a journey toward creating a culture that promotes stability, predictability, and performance while delivering continuous enhancements to the core or in supporting IT solutions. When implemented correctly and completely, DevOps essentially allows development teams to become a fully functional and interdependent symbiotic organism, delivering results that make the overall enterprise successful.

1. Define Your DevOps

 The first and foremost step is to clearly define the vision and scope of your DevOps. It is crucial that you create not only a Road Map, but also well-defined strategies that can help your organization navigate that roadmap. Define the desirable business objectives, ambitions, and ultimate vision, making sure they remain fully aligned with delivery capabilities and your organization’s overall objectives.

While you begin with manageable DevOps operations based on your organization’s particular capabilities, needs, and existing culture, don’t lose sight of the bigger picture. DevOps is about agility. Pick an initial team of capable and committed individuals, and avoid detailed, pre-made plans as much as possible. As you do, be ready for a widespread and more permanent cultural change throughout the organization. Ultimately, in the long term, it would be difficult to maintain an organization with two different cultures.

2. Create a Culture That Embraces Urgency and Change

 Business success relies heavily on the Release Velocity of a quality product. Make sure the new DevOps team fully understands this concept and embraces it as an operational value. A well-trained team with successful DevOps can be a direct contributor to your organization’s success. In addition to controlling the release velocity based on their understanding of urgent changes and needs, they will have the ability to reflect those changes in the live products and offerings. With this mindset in place, defects, security risks, and other serious inhibitors can be identified, mitigated, and addressed in a manner that remains out of reach for more traditional operations.

3. Define your DevOps Guiding Coalition Early

 The DevOps Guiding Coalition is comprised of the senior IT and operations decision-maker, along with the recipient stake-holders and beneficiaries (usually business). These teams should be supportive, capable, and empowered to communicate. Some of the most significant responsibilities of the coalition include removing obstacles, becoming an enabler agent, and empowering DevOps participants to execute the overall vision.

4. Communicate, Communicate, Communicate!

The core principle in the success of any DevOps is Communication. The concept of agility – referring to the ability to act and adapt swiftly – depends on effective communication throughout the organization and process. You want to make sure to clearly and frequently communicate the overall vision and scope as well as the roadmap, Strategies and lessons learned as work progresses.

Ensure that all team members, including the Guiding Coalition participants, are committed to the values of continuous delivery. Most importantly, work to replace a culture of risk-aversion and finger-pointing with one that promotes not only transparency and risk-taking, but also an open-minded environment that focuses on learning from mistakes and fixing processes.

5. Create Short-Term Wins

Success is all about delivering the right solution at the right time. The success of the DevOps rests heavily on the projects and how well they are executed. If new to the DevOps, make sure to select a couple of pilot projects that are a good fit architecturally and technologically and which do not depend too heavily on other ongoing projects. Ensure that your teams are fully capable, committed, trained, empowered, and enabled to be successful. Their success, in turn, will be measured on the delivery of timely, continuous, visible, and relevant results.

6. Long-term Plans for DevOps

The best way to expand DevOps beyond a pilot program is to consolidate improvements and scale up. Make use of the lessons learned from your pilot projects since they are the best indicators of success for your organization. To ensure your efforts’ sustainability, identify and partner up with leading organizations or providers that are respected experts in DevOps. Provide internal resources with the proper setting, training, and education. Empower your teams to develop their own flavor of the DevOps as long as their operation remains in harmony with the overall DevOps vision and Roadmap. Avoid micromanaging the team since such a restrictive governance framework would be counter-productive to an Agile work environment.

7. Institutionalize the DevOps Culture

Communication is key here again! Articulate the connections between newly implemented processes and corporate success factors. Clearly illustrate how changes in IT culture will directly benefit and positively impact the success of the organization. Identify which parts of your organization benefit most from adapting to the new DevOps culture and promote the concept of continuous change as part of a business-as-usual mindset. Identify and place relevant metrics and performance indicators to help understand and measure the impact on the organization’s overall success.

Moving forward, the entire organization will need to adapt to the new culture since it would be difficult to maintain an organization with two different operational cultures.

###

About the Author:

Dr. Khadem has over 23 years of Software Engineering and IT leadership experience with a consistent track record of delivery and driving increased levels of productivity, profits and internal/external customer satisfaction. Recognized as a Business, Technology (Mobile, Cloud Computing and Big Data), IT Strategy Evangelist and Change Agent who implements and manages complex technical solutions that delivers a strong value and ROI. Dr. Khadem holds a Ph.D. in Strategy & Information Technology, an MBA in Business Technology, and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.

 

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